fashion . News & Events

Would You Try Out Digital Clothing For The ‘Gram?

Virtual realities


Sometimes, it’s difficult for us to find clothes to wear. Despite our closets bursting with different sorts of pieces, it’s a challenge for us to find our OOTDs because there are tons of factors to consider. We can only mix and match clothes up to an extent. But can you imagine a life where you don’t need to shop for new clothing? No more seasonal wardrobe de-cluttering and revamping. Just simply send a fashion company of a photo of yourself, and you could have your choice of clothing edited onto you in an instant. 



Digital becomes reality



It seems like quite an interesting sci-fi material, but it’s actually a concept that already exists today. Due to reports of influencers buying outfits for single-use to post on their feeds, Scandinavian fashion retailer Carlings released their first-ever digital clothing collection last November. The line included 19 genderless, sizeless futuristic pieces. The digital clothing was sold from EUR10 to EUR30 (~SGD15.31 to SGD45.92) and customers simply supplied a photo that was manipulated by Carlings so they appeared dressed in it. Several influencers were hired to promote the line and it sold out in a week. Because of its positive response, the brand is now working on a second collection to be released this season. 


Looking back



If we’d look at the games released in the past few decades, people spending real money on digital clothes isn’t a new concept at all. There’s been the Kim Kardashian: Hollywood game, where users could dress her up in designs from Karl Lagerfeld, Balmain and more, which you could buy in virtual currency you earned in-game or with real money. There’s also Moschino, who earlier this year, in line with their The Sims-inspired fashion collection, also virtually released a specially-designed hoodie that could be used in the simulation game.



All for practicality



With people living more and more of their lives online, it’s not surprising that digital clothing is expanding outside gaming. After all, it’s pretty convenient. Because all your clothes exist in the virtual world, you save space in your wardrobe and you don’t have to go through a Konmari session at the end of every month. It’s also considerably cheaper, as opposed to buying garments that you’ll use only once for a photo. There’s no need to worry about sizing as well because these virtual clothes are literally one-size-fits-all. Lastly, and perhaps its greatest attribute, is that buying these can reduce our Carbon footprint because it skips all the production and shipping processes.


Sacrificing some joys



Still, with all its positives, there are bound to be some cons too. With digital clothing, the tactile experience of wearing your clothes is lost to us. You can no longer feel giddy as a silk dress slides smoothly on your skin, or feel the comfort of fleece knit sweaters. That empowering feeling of fashioning clothes that slay wouldn’t be present if we opt to digitise it instead.

 

With the Carlings first digital collection receiving positive response, this modern concept can undeniably rack up profits. It’s a greatly sustainable idea that can be catered for influencers and other people who show much of their lives online. Not to mention, it definitely has potential to expand the creativity of designers and wearers looking for other ways to explore their styles. But, it’s quite hard to imagine that it would sell to those who live without posting much on their social media. Whether or not it will pass as a fad or remain in the next few years, only time will tell.


(Cover photo from: @carlings_official)


For now, here are ways to style your fave jeans and shoe pairings.